Jul 15

Dances with Agnostics: SAVING KITTY

Alexander Cook and Jennifer Coolidge; photo credit: A.R. Sinclair Photography.

Alexander Cook and Jennifer Coolidge; photo credit: A.R. Sinclair Photography.

Presented by The Nora Theatre Company
Written by Marisa Smith
Directed by Lee Mikeska

July 9 – August 2, 2015
Central Square Theater
Cambridge, MA
Central Square Theater on Facebook

Review by Kitty Drexel (who could use some saving of her own)

(Cambridge, MA) Marisa Smith has written a very good script. Saving Kitty is so good that, if logistically possible, She should get a second production on its feet ASAP. This is because the Nora Theatre Company’s current production stars Jennifer Coolidge. Coolidge’s well-deserved star power overwhelms Smith’s writing (and the stage). It is inappropriately likely that patrons will remember Ms. Coolidge did a show in Boston that one time. They are less likely to remember whose show it was, what it was about, or who the supporting actors were. That’s a damn shame.    Continue reading

Share with Your Audience
Dec 05

Kissing Ass and Dropping Names: “The Tale of The Allergist’s Wife”

Photo credit: Mark S. Howard

Photo credit: Mark S. Howard. Their mortgage must be astronomical!

Presented by the Lyric Stage Company of Boston
By Charles Busch
Directed by Larry Cohen

Nov. 21 – Dec. 20, 2014
Boston, MA
The Lyric on Facebook

Review by Kitty Drexel

Trigger warnings: nontraditional sexy times, liberal politics, poop jokes

(Boston, MA) Just as Busch’s other works, The Tale of The Allergist’s Wife features a diva resplendent in her advancing glamour, highly stylized hilarity, and juxtaposes low brow against high brow comedy. There is an overwhelming amount of name dropping (philosophers, celebrities, book titles, places, historical events) but this is de rigeur for Busch’s work. Allergist’s Wife wastes no time explaining anything but the emotional realities of its characters (which are diverse and complicated). It’s the product one would get if you bleached the crap out of How Stella Got Her Groove Back and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, tossed in a quartet of rich Manhattan intelligentsia, and sauteed in a heaping spoonful of scatological humor. Allergist’s Wife is a highly enjoyable production if you can settle your stomach and keep up.   Continue reading

Share with Your Audience
Oct 08

Art, Process, and Connection in Miranda July’s “Lost Child!”

Photo Credit: Todd Cole

Presented by The Institute of Contemporary Art

Review based on the Oct. 6, 2013 performance
Barbara Lee Family Foundation Theater at the ICA
100 Northern Ave.
Boston, MA
ICA on Facebook
Miranda July on Facebook

Review by Gillian Daniels

(Boston) The Institute of Contemporary Art is a glass and steel structure near the shore.  On a gray, rainy Sunday, it looks imposing and a little unnerving. I’m reminded of the cold skyscrapers in Manhattan in my first visit there to see Miranda July on stage.  This isn’t a bad state of mind to be in.  Coincidentally, my first exposure to Miranda July was when I lived in New York and read her book of short stories, No One Belongs Here More Than You (2007).  I was enchanted with her writing, its self-deprecating jokes and nervous whimsy.  It appealed to me in a city where I often felt unanchored. Continue reading

Share with Your Audience