Sep 02

The Better to Allure You With, My Dear

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Photo Credit: Wax Wings Productions

Grandma’s House
Directed by Jennifer Reddish, Script by Kevin Kordis

Factory Theater (791 Tremont Street Boston, MA) from August 22-September 2

Wax Wings Productions
Wax Wings Facebook Page

Review by Kitty M Drexel

(Boston) Grandma’s House is a dramatic re-envisioning of the classic “Little Red Riding Hood” tale. Playwright, Kevin Kordis, brings the relationship between the Wolf and Little Red into the 22nd century as he explores the many definitions of the term “Wolf.” In this cautionary tale about cautionary tales, the cast and crew invite their audience to enjoy the fable of their youth and manipulate them into challenging their understanding of what a wolf is and can be. Continue reading

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Sep 02

One Performance Left! Luminarium Dance Company’s Mythos/Pathos

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Luminarium Dance Company presents
Mythos:Pathos
August 31 @ 8pm
September 1 @ 8pm
September 2 @ 4pm
in Black Box Theater
at Arsenal Center for the Arts

Watertown, MA

Purchase tickets at http://www.LuminariumDance.org/buy-tickets or call 617-477-4494 to reserve

(copy from Arsenal Center for the Arts)

Luminarium Dance will debut its new full-length performance Mythos:Pathos throughout August. The work will explore lesser-known characters and under-examined storylines of Greek mythology from a contemporary viewpoint. Artistic Directors Merli V. Guerra and Kimberleigh A. Holman are proud to weave these familiar myths into a cohesive saga, while coloring the production with innovative choreography. Mythos:Pathos also features nontraditional lighting design by Matthew Breton, that manifests in unique ways onstage, from wearable to handheld lighting. This new work will incorporate materials donated by the communities of Somerville and Watertown that will be used to construct installations on and offstage.

Luminarium plans to preview the project in Somerville. In late August, Luminarium will bring an evolved form of the project to the Arsenal Center for the Arts, for a one-week residency, including a gallery exhibit in the lobby. This performance at the Arsenal Center for the Arts offers a pre-show installation performance art series, followed by a full dance performance in the Black Box Theater.

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Sep 01

Two Hours of Sweet Traffic: ROMEO AND JULIET

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Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Still Harbor, Dorchester 8/31/12-9/2/12
As well as other performances along the Eastern Shore through 9/14/12

Brown Box Theatre Project
Brown Box Theatre Project Facebook Page

Directed by Kyler Tausten
Fight Choreographer: Conor Olmstead

Review by Craig Idlebrook

What are your evening plans this weekend?  Cancel them.  I’ve got a Shakespeare play for you.

Wait, no, I’m serious.  I can hear the arguments now from the Bard-haters: long-winded speeches, posturing on stage, something fit for academic halls.  But that’s why you’ve got to drop what you’re doing and see the Brown Box Theatre breathe some life into the dusty folios with a no-frills, fast-paced production of Romeo and JulietContinue reading

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Aug 25

Sweet Music: ALL SHOOK UP

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All Shook Up, Book by Joe DiPietro

Staring Joyce DeWitt

Directed by Russell Garrett
Music Director: Anne Shuttlesworth
Choreographer: Kiesha Lalama

North Shore Music Theatre
Beverly, Ma
August 14-26, 2012

North Shore Music Theatre Facebook Page

Review by Kate Lonberg-Lew

Elvis is tooling around the countryside when his motorcycle breaks down
and he finds himself stranded in repressed, naïve, small-town America. While his bike is being fixed by the town’s tomboy-teenage mechanic, he teaches the citizens how to let loose, love, and most importantly, rock out. This is the basis for the musical All Shook Up playing at the North Shore Music Theatre.
Continue reading

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Aug 25

What If? Racial Diversity in “Romeo and Juliet”

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My bounty is as boundless as the sea,
My love as deep; the more I give to thee,
The more I have, for both are infinite.

Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene II

Photo Credit: Happy Medium Theatre

Director: Paula Plum
Dance Choreographer: Kiki Samko
Fight Choreographer: Angie Jepson

Happy Medium Theatre Company
Happy Medium Theatre Co. Facebook Page

Exposé by Kitty Drexel

(Boston) Happy Medium Theatre (HMT) took a risk: it cast a black Romeo against a white Juliet (who had excellent chemistry by the by). Bravo HMT for having the chutzpah for casting biracially! Bravo for making your audience ask “what if?” What if Romeo had been a Moore like Othello? What if Juliet had fallen in love with her Romeo and the resulting drama was a result over their family names and not the color of their skin? What if their love was measured against all other loves and found to be equal? What if HMT’s version of Romeo and Juliet was the version that had been performed for centuries rather than the typical all White cast? Topical questions for 2012: What if, indeed.

In a time when the Supreme Court system cannot make up its mind as to whether marriage is a religious or a civil rights issue, HMT’s production forces us to take a look at the history of love. Just 15 years ago one wouldn’t see a biracial couple on daytime TV much less a reproduction of Shakespeare. It is time for all love to be measured by its inherent worth on the streets. It is also time for the shock to be amputated from love that exists outside the norm on the stage. If it has been acceptable for a 13-year-old girl to marry a 17-year-old boy for hundreds of years then it is certainly time for that couple to reflect its audience members.

As artists, we have an obligation to entertain and educate our audience, an obligation to leave our audience in better condition after the show than before it starts. It is our privilege as enthusiasts to create theater with our community. Thank you Happy Medium Theater Company for taking the opportunity to be poignant and to pose difficult questions. Thank you for being brave. Bravi tutti!

Performances ran August 10-25, 2012 at the Plaza Theatre at the Boston Center for the Arts,
537 Tremont Street, Boston, MA 02116

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Aug 20

Globe on Screen: An Opportunity to Experience London’s Globe Theater via Film

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Photo Credit: Ed O’Keeffe via Google

Globe on Screen brings the legendary London Shakespeare theater to U.S. cinemas, featuring three classic plays, including Much Ado About Nothing, All’s Well That Ends Well and Doctor Faustus.  The plays, which are captured in front of a live audience and hit U.S. screens beginning October 11, give U.S. moviegoers the opportunity to experience what it’s like to be there, in the center of London’s legendary Globe Theatre.  The well-known casts include Eve Best (The King’s Speech, Nurse Jackie), Charles Edwards (Downton Abbey) and Arthur Darville (Pelican Blood, Dr. Who).  The full trailer can be viewed here:  http://youtu.be/mttLEbQ1dWs

In cinemas across the UK, USA, Australia and New Zealand from September 2012.

Shakespeare’s Globe On Screen Trailer

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Aug 20

Acoustica Electronica: Dance Theater for Club Kids and Social Butterflies

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AcousticaElectronica: presented by toUch Performance Art

Club Oberon, August 3, 2012 to August 24, 2012, Fridays 10:30pm

toUch Performance Art                          toUch Performance Art Facebook Page

Review by Kitty Drexel

Photo Credit: toUch Performance Art

(Cambridge, MA) Acoustica Electronica (AE) is Dance Theater that blends music spanning 300 years, wrapped in operatic cellophane and wrapped in a pink party-kid ribbon. AE is realized as a club scene exuding the kind of immature sexual desperation usually found in strip joints. It has many elements that make up an excellent performance but together, these elements fall short of the experience AE hopes to create. Continue reading

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Aug 14

ANNOUNCEMENT-NO ROOM FOR WISHING Kickstarter Begins

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No Room for Wishing

kickstarter website:  http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/563348135/the-world-premiere-of-no-room-for-wishing

September 13 – 22 at the Boston Center for the Arts Plaza Black Box Theater and September 30 – October 9 at Central Square Theater’s Studio Theater

My interview with Danny Bryck from May:  http://www.netheatregeek.com/2012/05/20/geeks-nerds-and-artists-episode-7-danny-bryck/

(copy from kickstarter page)

“Hailed by Company One’s Artistic Director Shawn LaCount as, “an important and timely play by one of Boston’s most dynamic young theatre makers,” No Room for Wishing is comprised only of exact words compiled from interviews and live recordings at the occupation of Dewey Square from October to December of 2011.  Both personal and political, the show pieces together the voices and experiences of a diverse range of individuals into the larger story of the Occupy movement, both in Boston and as a whole.

No Room for Wishing follows Occupy Boston from its formation, through clashes with the police, infighting among the activists, legal battles and collective victories, to its eviction by the City of Boston. The play’s real-life characters, played by a single actor, represent a diversity of age, race, occupation, opinion and background, from college students to bankers to lifelong activists to the homeless. Their stories shed light on the complex identities and contradictions of Occupy, and of contemporary America.

The play has been in development for the past ten months, and has been presented in readings and workshop productions at Apollinaire Theatre Company, the Wall Street to Main Street Festival in Catskill, NY, Central Square Theater, and Boston University. The show has had a powerful impact on those who have seen it so far, and we want to bring it to a wider audience.

The World Premiere

In honor of the one-year anniversaries of Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Boston, No Room for Wishing will have its world premiere this fall. Company One and Central Square Theater, two of Boston’s most vibrant theatre companies, will co-produce the play, with support from Boston Playwright’s Theatre. The production is still dependent largely upon independent fundraising. With your help, the play will run September 13 – 22 at the Boston Center for the Arts Plaza Black Box Theater and September 30 – October 9 at Central Square Theater’s Studio Theater. We also hope to bring the show to other venues, including local schools and universities, and to tour the show beyond Boston. Your donation will go towards materials needed for this production, stipends for the actor, director, designers, and post-show discussion facilitators, the accrued costs of developing and touring the play, and more.

The Story

[Danny[ started working on No Room for Wishing in early October 2011, about a week into Occupy Boston’s occupation of Dewey Square. He had been interested for some time in documentary theatre in the style of Anna Deveare Smith, the Tectonic Theater Project, etc., and was feeling more and more of a need to unite his artistic pursuits with my political ideals. He began interviewing people on site, and the project continued to evolve from there as my understanding of the movement deepened, events unfolded, and stories he collected from people began to shape the direction of the piece. On the one hand, he wanted this play to serve as a deeper and more meaningful account of Occupy than Americans were getting from the news, and to challenge preconceived notions of why someone might decide to Occupy and what Occupy sought to and could achieve. On the other hand, he knew it was important for the play not to have a singular agenda, but rather be a genuine attempt at capturing all the rich complexity and contradiction of these people, this time, and this place, without apology.

Bryck wanted the play to ask – not necessarily answer – how do we relate to each other as individuals and as perceived groups in our society, what do we value, and what happens when we try to actively break down and reinvent those structures, those relationships, and those values? And he wanted to pose those questions indirectly, by letting the individuals and the events speak for themselves, forcing the audience to draw their own, hopefully new and more informed, conclusions. He believes this sort of true investigative process is sorely lacking in our society. Perhaps the main purpose of this play is to address that need.

To find out more, visit dannybryck.com/noroomforwishing. You can also listen to an interview about the project on The Bridge – Arts for the 99%, and watch a performance of an excerpt from No Room for Wishing on The Civilians’Occupy Your Mind.

Please be a part of this exciting and important labor of love. They have an ambitious goal of $10,000, but they’re confident thy can get there with your help. If they don’t reach our goal, they get nothing, so please pitch in and give what you can. In return for your generosity, they have a number of awesome rewards including complimentary tickets to the show, your own piece of the set, a remix of the sounds of Occupy Boston, an original song by Ruby Rose Fox featured in the show, the chance to be a part of your own documentary project, and a command performance of the play. Thank you so much, and he hopes to see you at the show!”

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Aug 13

The Pillowman Offers Dark, Bitter Comedy and Meditation on Art

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Flat Earth Theatre Presents The Pillowman by Martin McDonagh

Photo Credit: Flat Earth Theatre

The Factory Theatre, 791 Tremont Street, Boston, MA

August 10, 11 2012 @ 8PM
Sunday, August 12, 2012 @ 2PM
Thursday, August 16, 2012 @ 8PM – Pay-What-You-Can
Friday, August 17, 18 2012 @ 8PM
Flat Earth Theatre Company               The Pillowman Facebook Page

Review by Gillian Daniels

Under a totalitarian government, writer Katurian (Cameron Beaty Gosselin) and his brother, Michal (Chris Chiampa) are unfortunate enough to be arrested by the corrupt police force of their unnamed country. Exactly why they have been taken into the custody of Detective Tuoplski (Juliet Bowler) and the violent Officer Ariel (James Bocock) is teased out minute by painful minute. In this bitter tragicomedy, playwright Martin McDonagh asks tough questions about the responsibility of art and crime. Continue reading

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